People come in different color (Part 1)

People come in different color (Part 1)

Some colors bring out the vibrancy of each other making an attractive match.
Some colors simply fade or darken reciprocally.
Some colors look better when an intermediary color is placed between them creating a softer look.
Some colors become unnoticeable under the dominance of the other.
 
When you personify yourself with colors, the same dynamics apply.
Diverse yet matching hues are at the very core of all businesses encounters.
The primary colors can represent the culture, the mission, and the vision of the company rallied by its human capital. Secondary colors are the changes that each of us bring with our unique beliefs, behavior, and dynamics that transform into our routine. These routines, if accepted by the larger number of people, become processes later that are quoted as rules and SOP’s.
 Painting tube
An important rule of the color wheel is that colors opposite to each other usually work well together. These are known as Complementary Colors.
 
Obviously our purpose is not to give a lecture about colors. Our goal is to attempt an experience that if done properly, can lead people to a common platform for forming highly functional and beneficial teams (or you could use relationships instead of “teams”).
 
Years ago I came across an interesting word play, “Instant coffee – instant teams.” This was a revelation! It also sounded very similar to another discovery I came across that said “accidental sales people”.
I’m not sure if this is a situational term but I don’t know what “accidental sales people” means. 
 
Both seemed very close as both appeared to be easy steps in easy fields.
 
We thought, to create a team, it was enough to hire several people and provide them with business cards to flash happily at prospecting customers. We thought, to sell products or services, it was enough to be assertive, dynamic, energetic, and good looking. But, WHAT WE FOUND is that this was NOT ENOUGH to transcend growing sales numbers.
 
Then came the observers – such as Bruce Tuckman and his proposed Forming – Storming – Norming – Performing model of groups which explains that these phases are all necessary and inevitable for a team to grow, to face challenges, to tackle problems, to find solutions, to plan work, and to deliver results.
 
(The second part is coming soon …)
Written by Adile Cretallaz
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