Poor Interpersonal Skills (Case Study)

Poor Interpersonal Skills (Case Study)

Hello Readers,
 
We hope your weekend went well…
Today we would like to share with you an interesting case study about Jennifer a successful employee within her organization, however her CFO considers that she is a poor communicator and he needs to let her know about this issue.
 
How will you do ?
 
 
Jennifer is the Accounting Department manager for a regional chain of convenience stores. Jennifer is an accounting “superstar.” She has a bachelor’s degree, recently passed her CPA exam, and is really exceptional in her accounting knowledge.
 
She was so good, in fact, that she was promoted to department manager in her previous company after only two years on the job. She has been at her current company for ten months. She has implemented two accounting procedural changes that have streamlined the work and resulted in cost savings for the company.
 
She reports to the CFO, and he is concerned about Jennifer, despite her obvious talents. There is no denying that she has had a positive impact, but Jennifer is not fitting in so well. Jennifer is a poor communicator and seems to have alienated quite a few of her peers and her employees.
She is often aloof and distant, and her usual way of motivating performance is to simply dictate what will be done and expect compliance with her orders. She has good ideas but has little ability to present them well or to work as part of a team.
 
You are Jennifer’s CFO, and you believe you can coach Jennifer.
How would you approach her and what would you say?
What issues would you work with her on?
How would you hold Jennifer accountable for improvement on the issues you identified?
 
 Communication
 
 
The CFO could:
 
• Make an appointment with Jennifer to talk privately
• Offer specific and detailed feedback and observations about what he/she has seen that is of concern. Be direct but kind;
• Explain why her methods may be of concern and the impact they are having on others
• Identify a maximum of three change goals to which Jennifer will agree
• Set specific behavioral objectives and ask her to document what she does in regard to each goal
• Agree to meet again (weekly?) to discuss progress
• Consider assigning Jennifer an in-house mentor in another department if available or securing the services of an outside coach to help train her in and encourage practice of human relations skills
• Let her know that her performance appraisals will reflect how she is performing in her leadership role in addition to her accounting role
• Be a good role model for building teamwork and collaboration
 
And you, will you do the same ?
 
LSL Consultancy
No Comments

Post A Comment