management Tag

Losing a great employee is a terrible thing. There's the expense of finding, onboarding, and training a replacement. There's the uncertainty of how a new employee will work out. There’s the hardship on the rest of your staff until the position can be filled. Sometimes there's a solid reason—the person was a bad fit for the team or moved away for personal reasons, or was offered an opportunity too great to pass up. In those cases, even if it's a difficult transition, it feels fundamentally right. But what about the rest? Keeping your best employees starts with understanding why people leave. Here are seven of the top reasons: Stagnation Overwork Vague visions Profits over people Lack of recognition Lack of trust Excessive hierarchy ...

How employees should engage their company? Here are some ways to share.   Mentor a peer or colleague--you'll end up feeling better about yourself. This study showed that if you help someone for 10 to 30 minutes per day, it leaves you feeling as if you havemore time, not less. Explore opportunities inside your company to learn something new: Join a cross-functional project, pick up another skill, lead or participate in a "lunch and learn." Set short- and long-term goals that you can get passionate about pursuing, and that give you purpose. These can be little pet projects you do on your own, or things that align with a strategy or vision. Work those goals into bite-size chunks to make them manageable. Reward your peers with digital recognition and praise. Use a social recognition toolto nominate a person for everyday contributions and going above and beyond. Then share the success story with the rest of the company. Reward your peers with digital recognition and praise. Use a social recognition toolto nominate a person for everyday contributions and going above and beyond. Then share the success story with the rest of the company. Make close connections at work; in other words, have a best friend there. Gallup found that workplace friendships yield more productive employees. ...

5 Things the Most Respected Leaders Do Every Day 1. They Admit Being Wrong The conceited leader that proclaims his position and disregards differing points of view is a leader that will have few followers, mostly out of fear and intimidation. Typically, they know they're right, and they need you to know it too. But truly respected servant leaders are quite secure in admitting when they're wrong and made a mistake, or don't have all the answers. And they will back down graciously when being proven wrong. To them, it's more important to find out what is right than being right. Intellectual bullies? Rarely the case. 2. They Listen First, Speak Last Want to hear an insecure leader at work? Easy, just listen to how they take credit for something other people did, or how defensive they get when confronted with something our of their comfort zone. Well-respected leaders are unassuming and know what they think; they want to know what you think. This works brilliantly in meetings to tap into the strengths of others. These servant leaders realize they know a lot, and seek to know even more, and they know the way to do that is to listen more. 3. They Shine the Spotlight on Others The most remarkable servant leaders don't need the glory; they understand what they've achieved. They don't seek validation because true validation comes from within. They stand back and celebrate their accomplishments by letting others shine, which helps boost the confidence of others. 4. They Will Ask for Help Respected servant leaders are secure enough to admit a weakness and when they need help. By asking for help that others may see as a weakness, this leader knows that when he gets help, he pays that other person a big compliment. 5. They Recognize Others That Fight Alongside Them A respected servant leader never flies solo, but will always acknowledge his successes as a team effort. Humility serves him well, as he expresses deep gratitude for everyone involved in pulling together a project, no matter how big or small the role. He understands human nature and will make it a priority to recognize people for their hard work, both in public and private. A person that sees this leader in action not seeking self-glory, and instead building up others, will typically be more willing to follow that leader. That's a huge competitive advantage!  ...

10 WORDS SMART PEOPLE ALWAYS USE The rights words can motivate, inspire, and even change lives. The right words can turn an otherwise meaningless conversation into an unforgettable moment for your audience. Here are 10 words and phrases that are extremely motivating: 1. "If" -- improves performance when describing a hypothetical positive. 2. "Could" -- boosts creativity when used instead of "should." 3. "Yes" -- three "little yeses" of them can help close a deal. 4. "Together" -- makes teams work harder and smarter (up to 48 percent!) 5. "Thank you" -- makes acquaintances more likely to seek a relationship. 6. "Choose to" -- reframing from "have to" makes a big difference. 7. "And"  -- the best way to state a contrary opinion. 8. "Because" -- makes whatever you ask sound objective and rational. 9. "(Your name)" -- we prefer things connected to ourselves. 10. "Willing" -- can turn a "no" into a "yes."...

4 Simple Communication Phrases That Instantly Earn People's Trust Here are some communication phrases that will instill trust and confidence within your team. "What can I do to help?" When you are truly committed to helping others, it creates a ripple effect. Your team will have more passion to work with you and for you if they believe you have their back. Simply saying, "I know that this project is important to you. How can I help?" can move mountains. Be sure to follow through on your promise to assist. "I trust your decision." If your employees feel you trust them to do the right thing, it will boost morale and productivity. Remember, to be trusted, first you must trust. "What can I do differently?" Serve those you're leading, not the other way around. Let people know that their opinions count. Part of your job as a leader is to remove the barriers to success by observing what might be standing in the way of your employees achieving their goals. Determine how you can facilitate their progress without eliminating accountability. "What do you think is our best course of action?" Ask questions versus handing out orders. Considerable insight can be gleaned by asking for someone's opinion. This approach will win the hearts of your team members, as you'll be viewed as a leader who values the perspectives of others and cares enough to ask for feedback. Have faith in the process. Trust the people you lead. Say "thank you" more often, admit when you are wrong, and be open to new ideas. When you strive to develop more meaningful relationships with your associates, you'll experience a deeper and more fruitful form of success -- one that cannot be measured by profit....